(360) 943-9198 info@retailassociationservices.com

Click on a topic to comment/discuss

Categories

Past Topics

RASI Talk

Our Blog/Discussion Area

Safety tip of the week

Safety tip of the week

Your safety bulletin board

The Washington Code publishes basic requirements for what should be on your company bulletin board.

You must:

  • Install and maintain a safety bulletin board in every fixed workplace that has eight or more employees. Make sure the bulletin board is large enough to post information such as:

–       Safety bulletins

–       Safety newsletters

–       Safety posters

–       Accident statistics (OSHA 300A form)

–       Other safety educational material

WRA sends out a monthly safety packet including items to go on your safety bulletin board.  Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, suggests that your Safety Meeting notes also be posted there.  Remember Labor and Industries requires that you keep 12 of the last safety meetings’ notes on hand for review by employees.

Members can find past issues of the RASI SAFETY Meetings archive here.

WRA employs Rick in part, to help members remain in compliance with L&I safety requirements. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week :

Safety tip of the week :

Employers need to provide protective equipment

Employers in Washington State are required to provide employees with protective equipment if they have been unable to eliminate injury hazards in the workplace.

The state requires employers to make sure employees are properly trained in the use and care of protective equipment. Such equipment could be used to protect the eyes, face, head, body, arms, hands, legs, and feet with items such as goggles, helmets, head covers, gloves, rubber slickers, disposable coveralls, respirators, protective shields and barriers.  WAC 296-800-160

Even if a worker buy his own safety shoes, for example, the employer must ensure that the equipment is adequate to protect the worker from hazards on the job.

Retraining is required if an employer has reason to believe an employee lacks understanding or motivation to properly use protective equipment. Also, if an employer has changed job processes with new equipment, this would call for a review of any job hazard analysis and the new PPE needs, if any.

There are some good videos in RASI SAFETY TV‘s personal protective equipment section.  Our Retro members will find additional information in the Safety Library that can be helpful.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week:

L&I’s top 10 rule violations

 The table below shows the most common safety and health rule violations cited during Labor & Industries’ inspections for federal fiscal year 2016 (Oct.1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2016). This information can help strengthen your workplace safety program and prevent costly injuries and illnesses.

The list excludes construction and agriculture. The links provide further information about what is required in the topic area.

 

Topic Area Resources
Employer Chemical Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and GHS
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Personal Protective Equipment
Safety Committees and Safety Meetings Safety Meetings/Committees
Accident Prevention Program Accident Prevention Program (APP)
Basic Electrical Rules Electrical Hazards
First-Aid First Aid
Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite Asbestos
Portable Fire Extinguishers Fire Extinguishers
Confined Space Permit Entry Confined Space
Injury & Illness Record keeping Requirements Recordkeeping & Reporting Worker Injuries

 WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week

Safety tip of the week

How to spot alcohol, drug use in the workplace

According to SAMHSA, a federal agency tracking substance abuse, for 2015, there were about 139 million users of alcohol in the USA. Another 24.6 million Americans were illicit drug users, according to estimates.

When you combine those numbers, as well as the new Washington law permitting limited marijuana use, there is a great chance that one of your co-workers could be under the influence of some type.

Alcohol is the most common abuse issue in the workplace, with marijuana second and then misuse of prescription drugs.

Often people under the influence do not adhere to safe practices in the workplace.

To recognize warning signs of substance abuse, look for:

  • Frequent disappearances
  • Excessive sick or personal days
  • Uncharacteristic behavior
  • Rollercoaster work performance
  • Difficulty with relationships.

Substance abuse in the workplace can be devastating. It can impact an employee’s health and working relationships but also can reduce productivity, increase absences and increase the risk of accidents.

Employers should update their substance abuse policies regularly, making sure that alcohol, marijuana, illegal drugs and abuse of prescription drugs are addressed.  For information on how a small business can set a policy, click here.

Here is a good web link with tips for dealing with substance abuse problems in the workplace and here is a SAMHSA report for Washington State.  The RASI Safety Library has a section on Alcohol and Drug abuse for more information.

WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com

Safety tip of the week

Safety tip of the week

Don’t ignore near accidents

Bob was in a hurry to get a product out of the stock room.  Using a ladder that he could not quite position correctly because there was another object in the way, he went up the ladder to retrieve the item. As he was coming down, Bob felt the ladder sliding to the right.  He was able to correct his balance to stop the ladder from sliding any further and made it down to the ground safely.

The result was no injury, this time.

Scenarios like this happen in different ways, different places and often involve power equipment.  But, the sliding ladder was close to becoming an accident and needs to be addressed so that it doesn’t happen again.

Encourage employees to report near accidents so they can be evaluated and result in safety improvements that can be followed. Precautions aren’t required to slow an employee down but rather to keep them healthy and able to work.

WRA’s  RASI Safety Library has a section on near accidents that you can use at your Safety Meeting.

Rick is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety Tip of the Week

Safety Tip of the Week

Accidents reduce the size of paychecks

Many employers try to find ways to get employees to do their job as safely as possible. An effective way might be to explain that workplace accidents cost employees in their paychecks.

Part of the insurance premium that Labor & Industries charges a company is also passed on to employees in their paychecks.  If your business is accident prone, everyone’s take home pay will be affected.

It benefits employees to remain safe in order to keep insurance rates as low as possible. A good safety record also can earn a company accident-free discounts (just like your car insurance).

Lower rates mean that the employee portion of the premium will also go down. Employees who see unsafe work habits should remind their co-workers that accidents cost all employees in smaller paychecks.

Here is a link to an example of how the rate change affects take home pay. The term “experience factor” refers to an insurance calculation that compares a company’s actual injury losses and its expected losses. Insurance expenses rise as an experience factor rises.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist,  is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

RASI

Safety tip of the week

Your safety bulletin board

The Washington Code publishes basic requirements for what should be on your company bulletin board.

You must:

  • Install and maintain a safety bulletin board in every fixed workplace that has eight or more employees. Make sure the bulletin board is large enough to post information such as:

–       Safety bulletins

–       Safety newsletters

–       Safety posters

–       Accident statistics (OSHA 300A form)

–       Other safety educational material

WRA sends out a monthly safety packet including items to go on your safety bulletin board.  Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, suggests that your Safety Meeting notes also be posted there.  Remember Labor and Industries requires that you keep 12 of the last safety meetings’ notes on hand for review by employees.

Members can find past issues of the RASI SAFETY Meetings archive here.

WRA employs Rick in part, to help members remain in compliance with L&I safety requirements. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week :

Employers need to provide protective equipment

Employers in Washington State are required to provide employees with protective equipment if they have been unable to eliminate injury hazards in the workplace.

The state requires employers to make sure employees are properly trained in the use and care of protective equipment. Such equipment could be used to protect the eyes, face, head, body, arms, hands, legs, and feet with items such as goggles, helmets, head covers, gloves, rubber slickers, disposable coveralls, respirators, protective shields and barriers.  WAC 296-800-160

Even if a worker buy his own safety shoes, for example, the employer must ensure that the equipment is adequate to protect the worker from hazards on the job.

Retraining is required if an employer has reason to believe an employee lacks understanding or motivation to properly use protective equipment. Also, if an employer has changed job processes with new equipment, this would call for a review of any job hazard analysis and the new PPE needs, if any.

There are some good videos in RASI SAFETY TV‘s personal protective equipment section.  Our Retro members will find additional information in the Safety Library that can be helpful.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week:

L&I’s top 10 rule violations

 The table below shows the most common safety and health rule violations cited during Labor & Industries’ inspections for federal fiscal year 2016 (Oct.1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2016). This information can help strengthen your workplace safety program and prevent costly injuries and illnesses.

The list excludes construction and agriculture. The links provide further information about what is required in the topic area.

 

Topic Area Resources
Employer Chemical Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and GHS
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Personal Protective Equipment
Safety Committees and Safety Meetings Safety Meetings/Committees
Accident Prevention Program Accident Prevention Program (APP)
Basic Electrical Rules Electrical Hazards
First-Aid First Aid
Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite Asbestos
Portable Fire Extinguishers Fire Extinguishers
Confined Space Permit Entry Confined Space
Injury & Illness Record keeping Requirements Recordkeeping & Reporting Worker Injuries

 WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week

How to spot alcohol, drug use in the workplace

According to SAMHSA, a federal agency tracking substance abuse, for 2015, there were about 139 million users of alcohol in the USA. Another 24.6 million Americans were illicit drug users, according to estimates.

When you combine those numbers, as well as the new Washington law permitting limited marijuana use, there is a great chance that one of your co-workers could be under the influence of some type.

Alcohol is the most common abuse issue in the workplace, with marijuana second and then misuse of prescription drugs.

Often people under the influence do not adhere to safe practices in the workplace.

To recognize warning signs of substance abuse, look for:

  • Frequent disappearances
  • Excessive sick or personal days
  • Uncharacteristic behavior
  • Rollercoaster work performance
  • Difficulty with relationships.

Substance abuse in the workplace can be devastating. It can impact an employee’s health and working relationships but also can reduce productivity, increase absences and increase the risk of accidents.

Employers should update their substance abuse policies regularly, making sure that alcohol, marijuana, illegal drugs and abuse of prescription drugs are addressed.  For information on how a small business can set a policy, click here.

Here is a good web link with tips for dealing with substance abuse problems in the workplace and here is a SAMHSA report for Washington State.  The RASI Safety Library has a section on Alcohol and Drug abuse for more information.

WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com

Safety tip of the week

Don’t ignore near accidents

Bob was in a hurry to get a product out of the stock room.  Using a ladder that he could not quite position correctly because there was another object in the way, he went up the ladder to retrieve the item. As he was coming down, Bob felt the ladder sliding to the right.  He was able to correct his balance to stop the ladder from sliding any further and made it down to the ground safely.

The result was no injury, this time.

Scenarios like this happen in different ways, different places and often involve power equipment.  But, the sliding ladder was close to becoming an accident and needs to be addressed so that it doesn’t happen again.

Encourage employees to report near accidents so they can be evaluated and result in safety improvements that can be followed. Precautions aren’t required to slow an employee down but rather to keep them healthy and able to work.

WRA’s  RASI Safety Library has a section on near accidents that you can use at your Safety Meeting.

Rick is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety Tip of the Week

Accidents reduce the size of paychecks

Many employers try to find ways to get employees to do their job as safely as possible. An effective way might be to explain that workplace accidents cost employees in their paychecks.

Part of the insurance premium that Labor & Industries charges a company is also passed on to employees in their paychecks.  If your business is accident prone, everyone’s take home pay will be affected.

It benefits employees to remain safe in order to keep insurance rates as low as possible. A good safety record also can earn a company accident-free discounts (just like your car insurance).

Lower rates mean that the employee portion of the premium will also go down. Employees who see unsafe work habits should remind their co-workers that accidents cost all employees in smaller paychecks.

Here is a link to an example of how the rate change affects take home pay. The term “experience factor” refers to an insurance calculation that compares a company’s actual injury losses and its expected losses. Insurance expenses rise as an experience factor rises.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist,  is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week

Hands-Free Office Phone

As aging occurs, workers can lose flexibility in their neck, shoulders and upper back. Aging workers who use the telephone a lot at their desks might want to consider making a change.

Using a regular telephone handset with your shoulder hunched up and neck kinked over all day could over time can lead to muscle strains, headaches and soreness.

Using the hand set for quick intermittent calls is fine, but if you are on the phone a lot, an effective assist would be by using a ‘hands-free’ head set. This allows a worker to maintain proper posture while taking care of customers on the phone.

Headsets come in a variety of styles including wireless models. These headsets will also allow for volume adjustment when needed.  With this increase of comfort, employees can be more productive regardless of their age.

Rick Means, WRA Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com

Safety tip of the week

Understand falls to avoid them

It’s important to understand falling on the job to avoid having it happen to you. Often, an employee’s health and physical condition can contribute to a fall and possible injury.

There also are types of falls to understand. For example, slips and trips can cause falls. Typically, slipping involves insufficient friction on the bottom of your shoes, especially where your heel strikes the ground. This can result in a sliding motion and cause your center of gravity to become unsupported. This can cause you to lose balance and fall.

You can also fall by tripping over something you didn’t notice, such as an exposed cord on the floor.

Sometimes falls are affected by the health and physical condition impairing a person’s vision, judgment, and balance. This could be related to stress or illness, compromised eyesight, age, physical fatigue, or medications, alcohol or drugs.

Analyze your situation and ability by focusing on and watching what you are doing so that you are not distracted to avoid falling. There is more information on this topic for WRA members in the RASI Safety Library. Non-members can visit  RASI Safety TV  and look under Slip Trips Falls.

WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-200-6454, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

WRA

Safety tip of the week

Your safety bulletin board

The Washington Code publishes basic requirements for what should be on your company bulletin board.

You must:

  • Install and maintain a safety bulletin board in every fixed workplace that has eight or more employees. Make sure the bulletin board is large enough to post information such as:

–       Safety bulletins

–       Safety newsletters

–       Safety posters

–       Accident statistics (OSHA 300A form)

–       Other safety educational material

WRA sends out a monthly safety packet including items to go on your safety bulletin board.  Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, suggests that your Safety Meeting notes also be posted there.  Remember Labor and Industries requires that you keep 12 of the last safety meetings’ notes on hand for review by employees.

Members can find past issues of the RASI SAFETY Meetings archive here.

WRA employs Rick in part, to help members remain in compliance with L&I safety requirements. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week :

Employers need to provide protective equipment

Employers in Washington State are required to provide employees with protective equipment if they have been unable to eliminate injury hazards in the workplace.

The state requires employers to make sure employees are properly trained in the use and care of protective equipment. Such equipment could be used to protect the eyes, face, head, body, arms, hands, legs, and feet with items such as goggles, helmets, head covers, gloves, rubber slickers, disposable coveralls, respirators, protective shields and barriers.  WAC 296-800-160

Even if a worker buy his own safety shoes, for example, the employer must ensure that the equipment is adequate to protect the worker from hazards on the job.

Retraining is required if an employer has reason to believe an employee lacks understanding or motivation to properly use protective equipment. Also, if an employer has changed job processes with new equipment, this would call for a review of any job hazard analysis and the new PPE needs, if any.

There are some good videos in RASI SAFETY TV‘s personal protective equipment section.  Our Retro members will find additional information in the Safety Library that can be helpful.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week:

L&I’s top 10 rule violations

 The table below shows the most common safety and health rule violations cited during Labor & Industries’ inspections for federal fiscal year 2016 (Oct.1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2016). This information can help strengthen your workplace safety program and prevent costly injuries and illnesses.

The list excludes construction and agriculture. The links provide further information about what is required in the topic area.

 

Topic Area Resources
Employer Chemical Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and GHS
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Personal Protective Equipment
Safety Committees and Safety Meetings Safety Meetings/Committees
Accident Prevention Program Accident Prevention Program (APP)
Basic Electrical Rules Electrical Hazards
First-Aid First Aid
Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite Asbestos
Portable Fire Extinguishers Fire Extinguishers
Confined Space Permit Entry Confined Space
Injury & Illness Record keeping Requirements Recordkeeping & Reporting Worker Injuries

 WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week

How to spot alcohol, drug use in the workplace

According to SAMHSA, a federal agency tracking substance abuse, for 2015, there were about 139 million users of alcohol in the USA. Another 24.6 million Americans were illicit drug users, according to estimates.

When you combine those numbers, as well as the new Washington law permitting limited marijuana use, there is a great chance that one of your co-workers could be under the influence of some type.

Alcohol is the most common abuse issue in the workplace, with marijuana second and then misuse of prescription drugs.

Often people under the influence do not adhere to safe practices in the workplace.

To recognize warning signs of substance abuse, look for:

  • Frequent disappearances
  • Excessive sick or personal days
  • Uncharacteristic behavior
  • Rollercoaster work performance
  • Difficulty with relationships.

Substance abuse in the workplace can be devastating. It can impact an employee’s health and working relationships but also can reduce productivity, increase absences and increase the risk of accidents.

Employers should update their substance abuse policies regularly, making sure that alcohol, marijuana, illegal drugs and abuse of prescription drugs are addressed.  For information on how a small business can set a policy, click here.

Here is a good web link with tips for dealing with substance abuse problems in the workplace and here is a SAMHSA report for Washington State.  The RASI Safety Library has a section on Alcohol and Drug abuse for more information.

WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com

Safety tip of the week

Don’t ignore near accidents

Bob was in a hurry to get a product out of the stock room.  Using a ladder that he could not quite position correctly because there was another object in the way, he went up the ladder to retrieve the item. As he was coming down, Bob felt the ladder sliding to the right.  He was able to correct his balance to stop the ladder from sliding any further and made it down to the ground safely.

The result was no injury, this time.

Scenarios like this happen in different ways, different places and often involve power equipment.  But, the sliding ladder was close to becoming an accident and needs to be addressed so that it doesn’t happen again.

Encourage employees to report near accidents so they can be evaluated and result in safety improvements that can be followed. Precautions aren’t required to slow an employee down but rather to keep them healthy and able to work.

WRA’s  RASI Safety Library has a section on near accidents that you can use at your Safety Meeting.

Rick is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety Tip of the Week

Accidents reduce the size of paychecks

Many employers try to find ways to get employees to do their job as safely as possible. An effective way might be to explain that workplace accidents cost employees in their paychecks.

Part of the insurance premium that Labor & Industries charges a company is also passed on to employees in their paychecks.  If your business is accident prone, everyone’s take home pay will be affected.

It benefits employees to remain safe in order to keep insurance rates as low as possible. A good safety record also can earn a company accident-free discounts (just like your car insurance).

Lower rates mean that the employee portion of the premium will also go down. Employees who see unsafe work habits should remind their co-workers that accidents cost all employees in smaller paychecks.

Here is a link to an example of how the rate change affects take home pay. The term “experience factor” refers to an insurance calculation that compares a company’s actual injury losses and its expected losses. Insurance expenses rise as an experience factor rises.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist,  is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week

Hands-Free Office Phone

As aging occurs, workers can lose flexibility in their neck, shoulders and upper back. Aging workers who use the telephone a lot at their desks might want to consider making a change.

Using a regular telephone handset with your shoulder hunched up and neck kinked over all day could over time can lead to muscle strains, headaches and soreness.

Using the hand set for quick intermittent calls is fine, but if you are on the phone a lot, an effective assist would be by using a ‘hands-free’ head set. This allows a worker to maintain proper posture while taking care of customers on the phone.

Headsets come in a variety of styles including wireless models. These headsets will also allow for volume adjustment when needed.  With this increase of comfort, employees can be more productive regardless of their age.

Rick Means, WRA Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com

Safety tip of the week

Understand falls to avoid them

It’s important to understand falling on the job to avoid having it happen to you. Often, an employee’s health and physical condition can contribute to a fall and possible injury.

There also are types of falls to understand. For example, slips and trips can cause falls. Typically, slipping involves insufficient friction on the bottom of your shoes, especially where your heel strikes the ground. This can result in a sliding motion and cause your center of gravity to become unsupported. This can cause you to lose balance and fall.

You can also fall by tripping over something you didn’t notice, such as an exposed cord on the floor.

Sometimes falls are affected by the health and physical condition impairing a person’s vision, judgment, and balance. This could be related to stress or illness, compromised eyesight, age, physical fatigue, or medications, alcohol or drugs.

Analyze your situation and ability by focusing on and watching what you are doing so that you are not distracted to avoid falling. There is more information on this topic for WRA members in the RASI Safety Library. Non-members can visit  RASI Safety TV  and look under Slip Trips Falls.

WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-200-6454, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

SAFETY

Safety tip of the week

Your safety bulletin board

The Washington Code publishes basic requirements for what should be on your company bulletin board.

You must:

  • Install and maintain a safety bulletin board in every fixed workplace that has eight or more employees. Make sure the bulletin board is large enough to post information such as:

–       Safety bulletins

–       Safety newsletters

–       Safety posters

–       Accident statistics (OSHA 300A form)

–       Other safety educational material

WRA sends out a monthly safety packet including items to go on your safety bulletin board.  Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, suggests that your Safety Meeting notes also be posted there.  Remember Labor and Industries requires that you keep 12 of the last safety meetings’ notes on hand for review by employees.

Members can find past issues of the RASI SAFETY Meetings archive here.

WRA employs Rick in part, to help members remain in compliance with L&I safety requirements. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week :

Employers need to provide protective equipment

Employers in Washington State are required to provide employees with protective equipment if they have been unable to eliminate injury hazards in the workplace.

The state requires employers to make sure employees are properly trained in the use and care of protective equipment. Such equipment could be used to protect the eyes, face, head, body, arms, hands, legs, and feet with items such as goggles, helmets, head covers, gloves, rubber slickers, disposable coveralls, respirators, protective shields and barriers.  WAC 296-800-160

Even if a worker buy his own safety shoes, for example, the employer must ensure that the equipment is adequate to protect the worker from hazards on the job.

Retraining is required if an employer has reason to believe an employee lacks understanding or motivation to properly use protective equipment. Also, if an employer has changed job processes with new equipment, this would call for a review of any job hazard analysis and the new PPE needs, if any.

There are some good videos in RASI SAFETY TV‘s personal protective equipment section.  Our Retro members will find additional information in the Safety Library that can be helpful.

Rick Means, WRA’s Safety Specialist, is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198 x18, or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.

Safety tip of the week:

L&I’s top 10 rule violations

 The table below shows the most common safety and health rule violations cited during Labor & Industries’ inspections for federal fiscal year 2016 (Oct.1, 2015 – Sept. 30, 2016). This information can help strengthen your workplace safety program and prevent costly injuries and illnesses.

The list excludes construction and agriculture. The links provide further information about what is required in the topic area.

 

Topic Area Resources
Employer Chemical Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and GHS
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Personal Protective Equipment
Safety Committees and Safety Meetings Safety Meetings/Committees
Accident Prevention Program Accident Prevention Program (APP)
Basic Electrical Rules Electrical Hazards
First-Aid First Aid
Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite Asbestos
Portable Fire Extinguishers Fire Extinguishers
Confined Space Permit Entry Confined Space
Injury & Illness Record keeping Requirements Recordkeeping & Reporting Worker Injuries

 WRA employs Rick Means as a Safety Specialist who is available to members to help draw up safety plans and suggest topics for safety meetings. Contact him at 360-943-9198, Ext. 18 or rick.means@retailassociationservices.com.